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DARBUKA

HISTORY

Darbuka is a goblet shaped hand drum used mostly in music originating in countries near the Middle East. Its thin, responsive drumhead and resonance help it produce a distinctively crisp sound. Though it is not known exactly when these drums were first made, they are known to be of ancient origin.

Traditionally, darbukas may be made of clay, metal, or wood. Modern darbukas are also sometimes made of synthetic materials, including fiberglass. Modern metal darbukas are commonly made of aluminum (either cast, spun, or formed from a sheet) or copper. Some aluminum darbukas may have a mother-of-pearl inlay, which is purely decorative. Traditional drum heads were animal skin, commonly goat and also fish. Modern drums commonly use synthetic materials for drum heads.

The darbuka may be played while held under one arm (usually the non-dominant arm) or by placing it sideways upon the lap (with the head towards the player's knees) while seated. Some drums are also made with strap mounts so the drum may be slung over the shoulder, to facilitate playing while standing or dancing


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